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October 2011 Newsletter

Indigo Street Pottery Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! It is part of our website indigostreetpottery.com , which you can browse from this page if you click on the subjects in the header. We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, studios of our friends, garden musings, and whatever else strikes our fancy. Hope you enjoy it!



August 13, 2011: 2011 Annual Art Auction, Anderson Ranch Art Center, Snowmass, Colorado www.andersonranch.org


May of 2012: Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome, 2-person exhibition, Plinth Gallery, Denver, Colorado http://plinthgallery.com/

1                          Indigo Street Pottery Calendar

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterDecember_2010_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_128_link_0
GardenGarden.html

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Indigo Street PotteryHome.html
StudioStudio.html
Farraday NewsomeFarraday_Newsome.html
Jeff ReichJeff_Reich.html
Contact uscontact.html
NewsletterAugust_2011_Newsletter.htmlOctober_2009_Newsletter.htmlshapeimage_146_link_0
GardenGarden.html

December 2017 Newsletter

Indigo Street Studio Newsletter

Welcome to our monthly newsletter! We write here about our studio, arts events, projects, travels, and garden musings.

Indigo Street Studio Calendar

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In this Issue:

1. Indigo Street Studio Calendar


2. 2017 Indigo Street Studio Annual Holiday Sale


3. First Annual Yunomi Exhibition, ARC Contemporary Fine Art @ Manheim Gallery, Cottonwood, Arizona


4. Bottoms Up! cup show, Santa Fe Clay Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico 


5. The Art of Healthy Living, i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona


6.  Indigo Street Studio Travel Notes: Paris, France


7.  Garden Notes from Versailles and Giverny

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Bottoms Up! Santa Fe Clay Gallery, Santa Fe NM

August 26, 2017- tba: A Shared Passion, Phoenix Airport Museum, Terminal 4, Level 2, Phoenix, Arizona


September 29, 2017 - January 21, 2018: The Art of Healthy Living, i.d.e.a Museum, Mesa, Arizona


November 4 - December 31, 2017: First Annual Yunomi Exhibition, ARC Contemporary Fine Art @ Manheim Gallery, Cottonwood, Arizona


November 17, 2017 - January 13, 2018: Bottoms Up!, Santa Fe Clay Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico


December 2-3 & 9-10, 2017: Indigo Street Studio 2017 Holiday Sale, both Saturdays 10am- 4pm, both Sundays 12pm - 4pm, at our home studio Indigo Street Studio


January 20 - April 19, 2017: Docents Select VII: The Kitchen Sink, works from the permanent collection, Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum, Mesa, Arizona

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The Art of Healthy Living, i.d.e.a. Museum Mesa, Arizona

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First Annual Yunomi Exhibition, ARC Contemporary Fine Art, Cottonwood, AZ

Artwork by Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome is in the exhibition The Art of Healthy Living currently at the i.d.e.a. Museum in Mesa, Arizona. This show is aligned with the Association of Children’s Museums “Let’s Move” Campaign. http://www.ideamuseum.org/art-of-healthy-living.html


Museum Curator Jeffory Morris writes:

An exhibit that takes visitors on a visual journey that explores nutrition, exercise, mindfulness and overall wellness. Art, hands-on activities, and movement stations will explore topics such as physical fitness, nourishment of both body and mind, creativity and meditation.

The current exhibition at the Santa Fe Clay Gallery is a large cup show that include these two cups by Farraday Newsome. Dark Blue Cup with Oranges is 4.5” tall and Black and White Cup with Birches is 4.75” tall. Both cups are glazed terra cotta, 2017. The Santa Fe Clay Gallery is part of Santa Fe Clay, a large ceramics-dedicated space in the Railyard Arts District of Santa Fe. It houses a large classroom space, kilns, artist rental spaces, a supply store and the gallery. http://www.santafeclay.com


Every piece in this cup show can be seen by clicking https://santafeclay.com/collections/bottoms-up-1


Where: Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia, Santa Fe, NM 87501

When: November 17, 2017 - January 13, 2018

ARC Contemporary Fine Art @ Manheim Gallery is currently showing its First Annual Yunomi Exhibition. A yunomi is a Japanese teacup. It is used more informally than the ceremonial Japanese tea bowl known as a chawan. Unlike a chawan, a yunomi is often taller than it is wide.


Where: ARC Contemporary Fine Art @ Manheim Gallery, 747 N. Main St., Old Town Cottonwood, Arizona 86326  https://www.facebook.com/ARCCFA/?fref=ts

When: November 4 - December 31, 2017

Farraday Newsome, Forest Yunomi, glazed terra cotta, 4.5”x 4” and 3.5” x 3.5”, 2017

Jeff Reich is showing a series of digital photographs taken while running in the desert with our dog Skye.

Farraday Newsome, Dark Blue Bowl with Oranges, glazed terra cotta boxy, 6 x 13 x 13”, 2017

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Garden Notes from Versailles and Giverny

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2017 Indigo Street Studio

Annual Holiday Sale

This year’s Indigo Street Studio Holiday Sale will be the first two weekends of December:


Saturday, December 2 10am - 4pm

Sunday, December 3     12pm-4pm


Saturday, December 9 10am - 4pm

Sunday, December 10   12pm - 4pm


Where: 6931 E. Indigo St., Mesa AZ 85207  For driving directions, click here!


We set up our annual Holiday Studio Sale in our studio workspace and in our showroom. We hope you can come by to enjoy the art, native landscaping, kitchen garden, hot coffee and snacks!


We will have beautiful work in a wide price range, with items from under $50 on up to collector level. We  are delighted that you make time to visit and give us a chance to  catch up with how you’ve been this past year. Garden tours for the asking!


Below are photos of new work, the showoroom currently, and set-ups from past holiday studio sales.

We have new birds-on-a-wire, large and amall! These popular items are glazed terra cotta birds epoxied to solid copper wire &  meant for putting in the yard or a planter or wherever you dream up! $30 each.

There will be plenty of cups to choose from!

In addition to using our showroom for the sale, we transform our studio work area into display space. There will be a large selection of various-sized plates, bowls, cups, tiles, small and large sculptures, and paintings. We hope you can come by and check it all out!

Farraday Newsome, Aspen Plate, glazed terra cotta, 12 x 8 x 1”, wired to hang on the wall, 2017

Jeff Reich, Agave, stoneware, 21 x 10 x 10”,2017

Jeff Reich, Agave Fields, stoneware, 9 x 14 x 13”, 2017

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Indigo Street Studio Travel Notes

Paris, France

We’d been warned of the enormity of the Louvre’s holdings, but we were unprepared for the inherent grand lushness that comes of the museum being a former Royal Palace. The ceilings, floors, and stairwells were astonishing, often scene stealers!

Autumn plantings throughout the town of Giverny included huge mixes of sunflowers, chrysanthemums, dahlias and many other flowers. The use of so many colors, heights and textures created an emotional response of joy and gratitude for the abundance and beauty of nature.

This was our first trip to Paris, so where to begin?!!  At the beginning of course! Paris was founded on the Ile de la Cite, the small island in the middle of the Seine River. The great Notre Dame Cathedral dominates the island. Centuries ago a bronze plaque was set in front of the cathedral that marks the exact center of Paris and from which all distances from Paris were measured.

The Conciergerie, located on the Ile de la Cite near Notre Dame Cathedral, was part of the medieval royal palace, the Palais de la Cite, until Charles V moved the royal residences across the river to the Louvre in the mid-14th C.

The French Parliament moved in and used the palace for judicial matters. Fifty years later part of the Palais was converted into a prison that became notorious for its cruelty, injustices and torture.

During the French Revolution it remained a prison, with hundreds of prisoners tried, held and and taken to be executed, including Marie Antoinette.

The French judicial system is still headquartered here. We heard a concert in the adjoining historic royal chapel, Sainte-Chapelle, and went through considerable security due to the chapel’s proximity to the national legal center.

On our last evening in Paris we walked up the outside stairs of the Eiffel Tower to the second balcony, equivalent to climbing eighteen floors! The views during the climb were constantly changing patterns of metal curves and angles.

We spent our last morning in Paris walking along Rue Cler, a street famous for its markets, until we settled on a place for coffee and pastries. Sandwiched between our first week in Paris and this last day we spent two weeks traveling in Provence, the French Alps, and the Burgundy region of France. There will be notes from these adventures in upcoming newsletters!

We saw this incredible Henri Rousseau painting La Guerre (The War), aka La Chevauchee de la Discorde (The Ride of Discord), in the Orsay Museum, once a large train station and now an museum housing French art from 1848-1914. So many famous and beautiful Courbets, Manets, Renoirs, Van Goghs, Bonnards, Gauguins, and on and on! Magnificent and unforgettable!

The Cluny Museum is Paris’ museum of French art from the Middle Ages. It has a wonderful collection of medieval sculpture, stained glass windows, tapestries, jewelry and manuscripts.

The sculptures above originally depicted the twenty-eight biblical Kings of Judah and were mounted on the western facade of the Notre Dame Cathedral. During the French revolution the sculptures were mistaken for past French kings and decapitated. Twenty-one of the torsos and heads were unearthed in 1977 and are now beautifully displayed at the Cluny, ethereally flooded in natural light.

Although we saw many amazing objects, much of the museum was closed for restoration so we were unable to see the famous Lady and the Unicorn tapestries. Another visit is called for!

The Louvre has gallery spaces ranging from intimate to enormous. This immense Classical Sculpture Gallery is stunning, flooded with natural light.

Ah, the Louvre! After over twenty years of a recurring dream in which Farraday is in the French countryside asking directions to the Louvre and never getting there, we were finally here! We’d looked forward to seeing the gorgeous I.M. Pei glass pyramid placed so perfectly and symmetrically in front of the Louvre Palace at ground level, but we had no idea how beautiful it would be one floor down in the main hall. Beneath the 20th C pyramid a spiral staircase curves elegantly up to ground level with an expanding view of the 12th C palace.

On our first full day in Paris we walked to the Pompidou Center twice, once in the daytime to see the general collection, and then a return in the evening to see the traveling David Hockney retrospective show. We were struck by the constant blending of the old and the new. This huge mural of Dali was next to a beautifully preserved Gothic church in a courtyard adjacent to the Pompidou.

This is David Hockney’s Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), acrylic on canvas, 1972, photographed with a museum visitor. The show began its tour earlier in 2017 at the Tate Britain, then travelled to Paris through October 2017. It’s in the USA now at the NY Metropolitan through February 25, 2018.

David Hockney, Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy, acrylic on canvas, 1970-71.  This painting is a portrait of fashion designer Ossie Clark and textile designer Celia Birtwell after their marriage, for which Hockney was best man.

While we were in Paris we took a day trip to Versaille. In its day, the lavish Palace of Versaille was a politically and socially busy place, so Louis VI’s wife, Marie Antoinette, had a smaller, quieter royal compound built nearby. She fancied the simple, country life and wanted to have her own small hamlet, complete with vegetable gardens, small  livestock, and rustic cottages. A pretty fantasy, not a practical endeavor, this is one of those cottages and gardens, all of which are lovingly maintained.

Versaille is an old town very near the Palace of Versaille. Rather than Marie Antoinette’s charming, small hamlet gardens, this is where the considerable quantities of fruits and vegetables required for the palace and all its guests were actually grown. The Potager du Roi, Kitchen Garden of the King, was begun by Louis XIV.

The Potager du Roi is a vast garden with hundreds of espaliered fruit trees and multitudes of vegetable rows and plots. Today the Potager du Roi is run by the École Nationale Supérieure du Paysage, the French state school of landscape architecture. It is listed by the French Ministry of Culture as one of the Remarkable Gardens of France and currently under the direction of Antoine Jacobsohn.

We also took a day trip from Paris to Giverny, the small village made famous by its great resident painter, Claude Monet. Monet was an avid gardener as well as painter. Directly in front of his green-trimmed pink home are rows and rows of flower beds, a riot of color and texture. Beyond them, closer to the road that leads to the town of Vernon, is the famous water lily pond, which Monet dug, planted and maintained. Monet asserted that his greatest creation was his garden. We also walked though his charming two-story home and were especially smitten by the lovely yellow Monet family dining room.

The many flower beds run in parallel rows perpendicular to the large, wide Monet home. Green, forested hills rise behind the house. This is the central, trellis-arcaded pathway through the flower beds up to the front stairs. When you realize that the dark shapes close to the home are visitors, you get a sense of the scale of this nasturtium-lined pathway! .

Our annual holiday studio sale is coming up soon! It will be the first two weekends of December: 12/2-3 and 12/9-10. These are a few of the small works by Jeff Reich and Farraday Newsome that will be available, along with a lot more. Information, hours, location and photos below!

This new painting by Jeff Reich was inspired by our recent trip to Iceland. It is acrylic on canvas, 24” x 48”, 2017, and surrounded by Jeff’s high-fire stoneware sculptures and plates.

Farraday Newsome, Promise of the Garden, glazed terra cotta, 7 x 14 x 13.5”, 2017

A grouping of Farraday Newsome’s glazed terra cotta work.

A view of our year-around showroom with Jeff Reich’s stoneware sculpture in the foreground.

Jeff Reich, untitled, acrylic on canvas,  12” x 12”, 2017

Where: i.d.e.a. Museum, Mesa, Arizona

When: September 29, 2017 - January 21, 2018